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Binna Burra features in ‘Tourism – Ready for Recovery’

by | Jun 19, 2020

'This is just one more example of how our long term strategic partnership with Griffith University brings benefits not only to both parties, but also wider stakeholders in the tourism sector'

Binna Burra features in 'Tourism - Ready for Recovery

Griffith University in Australia has released a new online course which features Binna Burra Lodge as a case study on resilience in the face of bushfire recovery and managing the impacts of the global COVID pandemic.

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to have an unprecedented impact on the global travel and tourism industry. 'Not since WW2 have we seen such a disruption to the tourism industry ' saaid Dr Sarah Gardiner from the Griffith Institute for Tourism. 'Hope is not a strategy, but strategy is our greatest hope' she added.

Sarah has been instrumental in developing the course which provides key insights and information, videos, activities, scenarios and case studies to assist the tourism industry to navigate through the COVID-19 crisis, consider recovery action plans and emerge more resilient and competitive as borders reopen and restrictions ease. The course will help prepare destinations and enterprises in Australia and internationally to be ready for recovery.

Following the bushfire devastation last year, Binna Burra established a MOU with Griffith University as its lead University partner.

'This is just one more example of how our long term strategic partnership with Griffith University brings benefits not only to both parties but also wider stakeholders in the tourism sector' explained Steve Noakes, Chairperson of Binna Burra Lodge. 'Since its foundations in the early 1930s Binna Burra has always had close relationships with Universities, researchers and educators, and with the support of our new Science Advisory Group, We want to see that increase in the new era of Binna Burra'.

Binna Burra's Cultural Landscape is listed on the Queensland Heritage Register as a place ‚Äė‚Ķ important in the course of Queensland‚Äôs natural and cultural history‚Äô and for almost nine decades, it has been a significant base for a range of physical, biological and social science research and educational activities.